Radhika Arora

Associate

 

T: +254 709 250 000/709 250 707

E: radhika@oraro.co.ke

 

Radhika is an associate in the Dispute Resolution practice group. Her practice specialises in banking & commercial litigation and both domestic and international arbitration.

She has significant experience in advising both local and international clients in various sectors, including construction, public procurement and financial services.

In 2020, Radhika contributed to the Kenyan Chapter of the Chambers Global Practice Guide on International Arbitration.

Radhika holds a Bachelor of Laws (LLB) from the University of Kent, with a year in European Legal Studies from the University of Vienna and a post graduate diploma in Law from the Kenya School of Law.

“Her practice specialises in banking & commercial litigation and both domestic and international arbitration.”

Experience
  • Part of the team acting for a construction company in an arbitration where the company, which is the contractor, has been sued for KES 509 million (approximately USD 4.75 million) for an alleged breach of a Construction Agreement.
  • Part of the team that successfully represented a Pan-African Bank in a USD 25 million claim brought by a Zambian borrower who claims he never authorised the bank to disburse funds to the borrower. It was an ICC administered arbitration and the seat was in London.
  • Part of the team representing a Kenyan bank Under Receivership in a claim that seeks the tracing and recovery of approximately USD 340 million which was defalcated from a Bank.
  • Part of the team that represented a Kenyan government corporation in a petition brought by members of a now liquidated Kenyan commercial bank’s Employee Share Ownership Plan.
  • Part of the team representing various top tier banks in the country in the enforcement of a shared security pursuant to credit facilities worth a total of approximately USD 29 million advanced to a now insolvent retail supermarket chain.
  • Part of the team representing a Kenyan government corporation in a potential claim for professional negligence against an auditor of a bank in receivership, which ultimately resulted in a USD 380 million loss by the bank.